This example demonstrates the midlet lifecycle.




 /*
 * 
 * Copyright (c) 2000 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 *
 * Author: Srikanth Raju
 *
 * This software is the confidential and proprietary information of Sun
 * Microsystems, Inc. ("Confidential Information").  You shall not
 * disclose such Confidential Information and shall use it only in
 * accordance with the terms of the license agreement you entered into
 * with Sun.
 *
 * SUN MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES ABOUT THE SUITABILITY OF THE
 * SOFTWARE, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE
 * IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
 * PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. SUN SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES
 * SUFFERED BY LICENSEE AS A RESULT OF USING, MODIFYING OR DISTRIBUTING
 * THIS SOFTWARE OR ITS DERIVATIVES.
 */

import javax.microedition.midlet.*;
import javax.microedition.lcdui.*;

/**
 * An example MIDlet with simple "Hello" text.
 * Refer to the startApp, pauseApp, and destroyApp
 * methods so see how each handles the requested transition.
 */
public class ConsoleHelloMIDlet extends MIDlet
{
    /**
     * Start up the Hello MIDlet.  Just write some info
     */
    public void startApp() {
        System.out.println( "\nHello Camp" );
        pauseApp();
    }

    /**
     * Pause is a no-op since there are no background activities or
     * record stores that need to be closed.
     */
    public void pauseApp() {
       System.out.println( "In pauseApp... " );
       destroyApp( true );
    }

    /**
     * Destroy must cleanup everything not handled by the garbage collector.
     * In this case there is nothing to cleanup.
     */
    public void destroyApp(boolean unconditional) {
       System.out.println( "In destroyApp... " );
    }

}